SUPREMELY AWKWARD: Mysterious Toilet Flushes While Supreme Court Conducts Business Via Phone

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Supreme Court Live-Streams Audio Of Oral Arguments For First Time In Its History

[otw_shortcode_dropcap label=”C” font=”Ultra” background_color_class=”otw-no-background” size=”large” border_color_class=”otw-no-border-color”][/otw_shortcode_dropcap]elebrities say “we’re all in this together” from their yachts and castles in France, but we’re not. Politicians say “we’re all in this together” as they galivant about wearing masks incorrectly or without one at all, but we’re not. However, there is one elite group with which we suddenly feel are kindred spirits: The United States Supreme Court.

First off, like the rest of us, the Court needed to conduct their business over the phone, not their usual prestigious courtroom setting. Likely the Justices also had to find comfortable spots in their homes they never thought they would have to sit at for hours on end; and hopefully, they too never changed out of whatever they slept in.

Even Supreme Court Justices, it seems, face the same distractions and human necessities while quarantined during COVID that the rest of us do. And that friends, is flushing the toilet. That’s right, “a flushing toilet could be heard while the highest court in America was listening to arguments over the phone during a global pandemic” reported Law And Crime.

The flush was heard during the case of Barr v. American Association of Political Consultants, Inc. Attorney Roman Martinez was giving arguments over the “question of whether the Telephone Consumer Protection Act of 1991’s robocall ban is ‘an unconstitutional content-based restriction of speech, and if so whether the Fourth Circuit erred in addressing the constitutional violation by broadening the prohibition to abridge more speech.”

Stuck at home, conducting business over the phone, toilets flushing during business calls, and dealing with robocalls? Yes, Supreme Court, we are “in this together” indeed.

Martinez argued for the position of the respondents who say they are “direct participants in the American political process who wish to use automatic-call technology to engage in political speech at the core of the First Amendment.” Therefore, the respondents were challenging the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA) which “imposes liability of up to $1,500 for any call or text message made or sent without prior express to a cell phone using an automatic telephone dialing system or an artificial or prerecorded voice” claim the respondents.

Stuck at home, conducting business over the phone, toilets flushing during business calls, and dealing with robocalls? Yes, Supreme Court, we are “in this together” indeed.